Blog Title: Low Oxalate Fruit: The Complete List over a background with citrus fruits

Low Oxalate Fruit: The Complete List

Let me guess. You’ve been told to avoid oxalate because you had a kidney stone and now you have NO idea what to eat. I’m here for you!

The feeling that you can’t eat all of your favorite healthy foods, like fruits and vegetables is one of the most frustrating things about a low oxalate diet. As a kidney stone dietitian I promise, you CAN (and SHOULD!) eat fruits and vegetables for kidney stone prevention.

In fact, MOST fruits are low oxalate. Read on to learn more!

Who Needs Low Oxalate Fruit?

Before we dive into the world of low oxalate fruit, it is important to understand who actually NEEDS low oxalate fruit in the first place.

Hint: Just because you have oxalate kidney stones does NOT mean you need a low oxalate diet! (1)

The key to make sure a low oxalate diet will prevent kidney stones is a 24-hour urine test. This test will tell you and your doctor why your body is making kidney stones. Without it, it is a guess what will actually prevent stones for YOU! Kidney stone nutrition is different for everyone.

If your oxalate is high on a 24-hour urine test, you might need to cut back on how much oxalate you eat. Eating enough calcium is usually a more effective way to lower urine oxalate.

If you do not have high urine oxalate, you do not need a low oxalate diet. A low oxalate diet will likely not prevent kidney stones for you. You don’t need to worry about low oxalate fruit!

If you’ve never had a 24-hour urine test, check out my tips to ask your doctor for the test!

Kidney Stone Nutrition is A Lot More Than Oxalate

Even if you do need a low oxalate diet, chances are there is A LOT more you can do to prevent kidney stones. (2)

In fact, oxalate is the LEAST of my concerns for most of my patients with kidney stones. Yes, even if they have calcium oxalate kidney stones!

Image showing that you think that eating less oxalate will result in fewer kidney stones. Comparing to what will REALLY lower urine oxalate (eating 1000-1200mg calcium, avoiding too much animal protein and avoiding foods very high in oxalate)

Depending on your 24-hour urine test results, there are many possible nutrition changes you could make to stop kidney stones. Here are some of the most common nutrition changes I recommend for kidney stone prevention:

  • Drink more water!
  • Watch how much sodium you eat. Most people should aim for about 2,300mg of sodium per day.
  • Eat more dairy to help make sure you get enough calcium.
  • Eat smaller portions of meat, chicken or fish.
  • Push the produce! Eating more fruits and vegetables is one of the most effective ways to ward off kidney stones.

Check out my articles about calcium oxalate and uric acid kidney stones for more detailed information.

It is KEY to make sure your diet is personalized to your 24-hour urine test results. Otherwise, your diet changes may not be targeting your body chemistry, and not doing much to prevent kidney stones for YOU.

Check out Kidney Stone Nutrition School to learn more about how I help people create personalized plans to prevent kidney stones!

Why Eat Low Oxalate Fruit?

If you need a low oxalate diet, low oxalate fruit is an important part of your day!

People who eat more fruits and vegetables tend to have fewer kidney stones. (3) (4) (5) Even on a low oxalate diet, it is incredibly important to still get in your fruits and veggies! You just have to choose lower oxalate fruits and vegetables.

As a reminder, if you don’t have high urine oxalate, all fruits can be eaten for kidney stone prevention!

My Favorite Low Oxalate Fruits

Here are my favorite low oxalate fruits. See below for a more complete list of low oxalate fruit!

Grapes

2mg oxalate per cup

A classic. Both red and green grapes are a great low oxalate fruit option.

Enjoy them plain. Or, get fancy and roast them to add to things like flatbreads, oatmeal or salads!

Blueberries

4mg oxalate per cup

Not all berries are high in oxalate. Blueberries are a great low oxalate fruit option. As a Michigan girl, I LOVE blueberries.

Check out this delicious Blueberry Cobbler recipe!

Pineapple

4mg oxalate per cup

What is better than biting into a juicy piece of pineapple? I love snacking on pineapple chunks. Try grilling pineapple slices to jazz up chicken sandwiches, pizza, salads and even an occasional cocktail! Pineapple is also a delicious addition to stir fry.

Image of low oxalate fruits including: apples, blueberries, pineapple, pears, watermelon and grapes

Pears

2mg oxalate per pear

I think pears may be one of the most underrated fruits out there. Pears are delicious!

Again, eat them raw. Or, roast them to add to sandwiches, salads, oatmeal, toast or flatbreads.

I also love this Maple Pear and Goat Cheese salad. Exciting salads like these are such a wonderful way to up your produce intake for kidney stone prevention. Note: This salad does have pecans on it, but not all nuts are high oxalate!

Melon

0-1mg oxalate per cup

Melon lovers rejoice! All varieties of melon are a great low oxalate fruit choice. Low oxalate melon includes:

  • Watermelon
  • Cantaloupe
  • Honeydew Melon

Try my Watermelon Lime Sorbet as a delicious frozen summer treat!

Apples

1mg oxalate per apple

Yes! All varieties of apples are low oxalate. By themselves, apples are the perfectly portioned portable snack!

You can also bake apples into a tasty apple crumble, chop them into salads or use as a yogurt topping (sprinkled with a little cinnamon!).

I also love these dried apple slices*!

More Low Oxalate Fruit

I could go on and on with all of the delicious low oxalate fruit options out there. Here are some more of my favorites:

  • Apricots
  • Bananas
  • Blackberries
  • Cherries
  • Cranberries
  • Lemons & Limes
  • Plantains
  • Plums
  • Peaches
  • Strawberries

High Oxalate Fruit

If you need a low oxalate diet, there are few very high oxalate fruits that you need to limit.

Here are some very high oxalate fruits:

  • Raspberries (48mg oxalate per cup)
  • Dates (24mg oxalate per date)
  • Canned or Dried Pineapple (24mg & 30mg oxalate per 1/2 cup, respectively)

That is it! Truly, all other fruits can fit in a healthy diet for kidney stones.

Ask your dietitian if you need to avoid oxalate and how to enjoy your favorite fruits! If you can’t find a dietitian who specializes in kidney stones, check out Kidney Stone Nutrition School. My favorite part is helping people understand how many healthy and delicious foods they can eat to prevent kidney stones!

Happy Eating!

Melanie

6 thoughts on “Low Oxalate Fruit: The Complete List”

  1. As a diabetic, It has been very interesting and hard to learn what to eat., for kidney stones as well. I am hoping after my next 24 urine tests can relax about how much low oxalate I will need to eat. I hope with low salt and more water with address some of the issues As a diabetic I was trying to eat more protein and fewer carbs. The kidney stone diet has reduced the amount of protein, I have been trying to have more cheese, eggs, and beans. I do have some ground turkey waiting for me of the next few days.

    1. Melanie Betz MS, RD, CSR, CSG

      It can be challenging to combine recommendations for multiple conditions! Luckily changes for diabetes and stones are really MUCH more alike than you might think! Let me know if you ever want my help!

    1. Melanie Betz MS, RD, CSR, CSG

      Raisins can be a great way to add some extra fiber and some sweetness to oatmeal! I can’t say what is best for YOU. Ask your dietitian who is familiar with your medical history, current eating habits and labs!

  2. I love figs, particularly dried figs steeped in white tea to make them extra soft, juicy and comfortingly warm. The Harvard list says 5 dried figs have 24 mg oxalate. Thankfully, I suppose that’s still on the low side.

    1. Melanie Betz MS, RD, CSR, CSG

      Yum! That sounds delicious! It is also so important that “low” and “high” oxalate foods are very subjective. There is no definition or cutoff of what defines a “low” oxalate food. This is actually good, as everyone has different oxalate needs. It sounds like you’ve made a way to make your beloved figs work for you!

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